RouterGod Interview Series

Charles Manson on Floating Static Routes

It recently came to our attention that many of our readers needed clarification on just what is a floating static route and how is it configured on a Cisco router.  When it comes to dynamic routing protocols, there is plenty of literature, however the dark, sinister world of static routing remains a mystery.  We put the word out on the streets that we were looking for anyone that would take us on a guided tour into the sleazy sub culture of floating static routing.  After many midnight meetings with dubious and unscrupulous characters, everything seemed to point to Charles Manson as the creator of the floating static route.  We sent RouterGod cub reporter Tom Hatton to California's Corcoran State Prison where he interviewed Charles Manson


Charles Manson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Charlie enjoys arts and crafts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Few blood thirsty maniacs
play the guitar as well 
as Charlie.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie

Let's get something straight, I aint your father, I aint your brother, I aint the boogey man.  You came here, I didn't come to you.  This is an illusion.  You don't know it but we live in a prison within a prison within a gulag within a school room within a world controlled by the Man and he's pull'n the strings.

Tom

We recently learned that you are the creator of the floating static route, is that so?

Charlie

Damn straight I did sonny boy. Somebody had to do it, and as usual everybody said "let Charlie do it".  But that was your thought because the world is yours. I'm just in your world. I'm in your world with your permission and I can only exist with your permission because if you don't want me to exist, then I will live in another dimension.

Tom

OK.....why a floating static route?  Can you explain?

Charlie

Well here's the deal, a Cisco router will always chose a static route over any route learned by a routing protocol, Cisco routers love static routes because they always have a lower administrative distance than a route learned dynamically.

Tom

That makes sense, a static route should be given preference.

Charlie

It makes sense to you because you are part of the big plan, the New World Order is in cahoots with the ancient Egyptian gay men to smuggle the future into the past.  What if you want a static route to have a higher administrative distance than a route learned from say, OSPF?  How would you achieve that?

Tom

I still don't understand, why would I want to change the administrative distance of a static route?

Charlie

Say you have a router at a remote office connected to the main office using frame relay.  The router at the remote site is running OSPF and getting Hello packets across the frame link, everything is cool.  But say you wanna have a backup dial interface come up in case the frame relay link bombs.  Since OSPF has an administrative distance of 110 and a static route has an administrative distance of 1, when everythings fine the router will route packets through the dial up interface because the route is more trustworthy.

So if you could assign the back up interface an administrative distance greater than OSPFs 110, like give the static route an AD of 112, then when the links goes down, the static route will be the route with the lowest AD.

Tom

How does this happen, how does the router know that the frame relay link has gone down?

Charlie

Simple, after the router stops getting Hello packets from over the frame link, the route to the remote networks will age out and be removed from the routing table, now the only route to those networks will be the static route, or "floating static route", it's called floating 'cause you assign the administrative distance, this causes your dial up interface to come up and provide back up.  

Tom

Oh, now I see!  How do you configure that?

Charlie

Easy my man, it is exactly like a static route command except you append the administrative distance to the end of the command.  Here's what it looks like:

ip route 192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.4.1 112

Tom

So that's all there is to it?  That's a snap!

Charles

Like everything else, it's easy when you know how!

 

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